March 8th is International Women's Day and today we celebrate women all over the world and bring awareness to gender equality and women's rights.

According to InternationalWomensDay.com, "International Women's Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. Significant activity is witnessed worldwide as groups come together to celebrate women's achievements or rally for women's equality."

Every year since 2010, International Women's Day has had a theme and the 2021 UN theme for International Women's Day is "Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world"

The current form of International Women's Day was established in 2010 but many countries have been celebrating a Women's Day for decades. The United Nations began celebrating the holiday in 1977, but the United States has been celebrating a Women's Day since 1909 when the Socialist Party of America organized the event.

The history of Women's Day has been tied pretty closely to socialist and communist ideologies throughout the 20th century, and it wasn't until the 1960s when the holiday became more mainstream when feminists latched on to the idea.

There are many ways to celebrate International Women's Day and you can check out a few of those here.

LOOK: Milestones in women's history from the year you were born

Women have left marks on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics, and technology. Each passing year and new milestone makes it clear both how recent this history-making is in relation to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still need to go. The resulting timeline shows that women are constantly making history worthy of best-selling biographies and classroom textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll through to find out when women in the U.S. and around the world won rights, the names of women who shattered the glass ceiling, and which country's women banded together to end a civil war.