Midwesterners are known for a lot of things such as our kindness, our love of ranch, our interesting lingo... and there's now a beer that perfectly sums that up.

Kalamazoo-based Bell's Brewery just rolled out their new beer "No, Yeah" which they describe as "just a really nice beer." No, yeah is a play on one of our many amusing phrases which simply means "yes."

Not only is the name of the beer hysterical but the packaging has a fun retro feel to it with bright, fun, in your face colors. Hmm... it really does sound like a Midwesterner; and if the great people of the Midwest states had a taste, it would be this Golden Ale beer.

This lighter craft beer option is crisp and dry with a slightly sweet flavor profile. It is balanced, not overly bitter and will resonate with fans of lagers and those just looking for a really nice beer.

The beer has an alcohol content of 4.5% and is a great option when you want something light and refreshing after a hard day of work. You know that's a fact since 'hardworking' is another term you'd use to describe Midwesterners.

No, Yeah may be the name of this new Bell's beer but our unique language doesn't end there. That's why you'll also find other popular phrases scattered on the beer can and box, and you better believe "ope" is one of them.

In case you're reading this and not familiar with the Midwestern vernacular, Bell's provided a breakdown of some of our most used sayings:

  • No, yeah: yes
  • Yeah, no: no
  • Yeah, no, for sure: definitely
  • Yeah, no, yeah: sorry, but unfortunately it's a yes
  • No, yeah, no: oh no you're fine
  • Ope, sorry: I’m just gonna sneak past ya and grab the ranch

When you read these it's almost ridiculous that we actually understand one another with this kind of talk. Admit it though, you can't help but laugh. It's funny because it is so.damn.true.

No, Yeah is now available for purchase in draft and in a 6-pack of cans. It's been distributed throughout Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Ohio, Illinois, and Minnesota.

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MORE: Here's the Michigan Slang Out-of-Staters Need to Know